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 Uses of Amla, Avla

  Last Updated : Jan 02,2019






8 Uses of Amla 

Amla is the round-shaped, vertical-striped fibrous fruit of the deciduous tree "Euphorbiaceae". It is greenish-yellow in colour and has a distinctive sour flavour, which nevertheless lends itself well to many culinary uses.

1. Amla, due its sour taste, is mostly used in the preparation of variations of pickles along with other ingredients, the most common ones being the spicy pickle and Amla Murabba, a dish of candied amla. 

2. It is considered to be healthy due to the numerous health benefits it has. Because of this it is advised to be consumed in the form of freshly-prepared amla juice, with a dash of honey to make the bitterness palatable. 

3. Dried and powdered amla powder can be sprinkled over fruits or also can be used in the preparation of health drinks

4. During the winters, amla can be turned into a subzi as well to take advantage of the fruit in more than a bite. You can also combine it with rice to make a tangy rice dish. 

5. Freshly-sliced amla can be stewed in sugar syrup and then used as a topping for fruit tarts, cakes, cheesecakes etc. 

6. Amla is processed into syrups and crushes, which are commonly used in many mocktails.

7. When amla is in season, south Indians often parboil it in salted water and preserve it in glass or earthen jars along with the water in which it was cooked. There should be enough water to drown all the gooseberries. Called Neer Nellikkai, this can be stored in the refrigerator for more than a month.

8. Amla juice is also applied on the scalp which helps in preventing hair fall. 

 

To know about Recipes using Amla, check out our collection.

uses of amla

1.  
 by Tarla Dalal
An invaluable winter preserve. Amlas (Indian gooseberries) are a major ingredient in several herbal tonics as they are reputed to be good for the liver, eyes and stomach. Amlas are the richest known source of vitamin C. Amlas are abundantly available during the winter months. I actually buy a large quantity of this fruit each year to make murabbas. Whole amlas simmered in a cardamom and saffron flavoured syrup is one of my personal favourites. There are several traditional recipes for making this murabba. Some soak the amlas in alum (phitkari) overnight whilst others sun-dry amlas. I find it easiest to cook the amlas in boiling water to get rid of all its bitter juices. The entire process takes about 2 to 3 days. First the amlas are simmered in a thin sugar syrup and left aside for 2 days during which the amlas slowly and gradually soak in the syrup. On the third day, the syrup is boiled again along with the flavouring to a thick honey like consistency and the amlas are added. The thick syrup helps in the preservation of the murabba and also complements the sharp and acidic amla taste. When preserved for a long period of time, the syrup of the murabba turns to a dark brown to an almost black colour and takes in all the goodness of the amlas. I am sure you will enjoy this recipe as much I have enjoyed making it for you.
2.  
 by Tarla Dalal
A shot of Amla Juice had first thing in the morning is like a magic potion for your body! The vitamin C dense drink helps to boost your immunity and build your body’s defences against various diseases. Vitamin C also acts as an antioxidant and helps rejuvenate your skin, purify your blood, reduce the risk of cancer , and slow down signs of ageing. It also reduces the level of acids in the stomach and helps combat stomach inflammation, a common problem faced by many people nowadays. To be frank, this juice is a bit tart and might not be enjoyed by many of you. But, if you add a dash of honey to it, you will be amazed by how the flavour improves, and leaves a nice, interestingly sweet aftertaste on your palate!
 
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Come winter, the market is flooded with amla. Most people make it into pickles, while others explore newer ways of consuming it like juices or chutneys. Have you ever thought of making a subzi with this vitamin C rich fruit? Amla is a very beneficial berry, with anti-inflammatory properties. By cooking it into a subzi, you get an opportunity to consuming a larger portion than as a pickle. This unique Amla Subzi is flavoured with an interesting mix of seeds like coriander and fennel. With a dash of jaggery and spice powders, it has a blend of sweet, sour and spicy flavours. Enjoy it hot and and fresh with roti and parathas, or hot rice and dal. You can also try other amla recipes like Amlana or Amla Murabba .
4.  
 by Tarla Dalal
Here is a peppy rice dish with the tangy taste of amla, which is a must-try when the berry is in season. It has a refreshing taste, which excites the palate. Perfectly cooked rice is flavoured with grated amla and perked up with a crunchy seasoning of mustard seeds, dals and peanuts. This tangy Amla Rice, punctuated by crunchy titbits like dal and peanuts, is a great hit with young and old alike. You can also try other amla recipes like Amla Infused Water or Amla Murabba .
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