sugar syrup

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Description
Depending on how thick you like your sugar syrup to be, a ratio of sugar is to water can range between 1:1 to 2:1. This simple syrup can be made at home in a saucepan. Remember to stir the sugar in the water before you add heat to it and not after as the sugars will crystallise, rendering a rough finish to it. This syrup is a substitute for people who are allergic to honey and corn syrup.

How to Select
• Sugar syrup is readily available commercially.
• The naturally light syrup is used in candy making and the darker coloured syrup is used for general baking purposes.
• If purchasing it commercially ensure that the seal is unbroken.
• Please read the manufacturing and expiry dates to ensure maximum product freshness.

Culinary uses
• Baked goods, candy, frostings, jams, jellies all use sugar syrup both as a sweetener and as a preservative.
• Cookies, rice crispies, caramel snack mixes, nutritional bars, ice creams, and sorbets all include sugar syrup as one of their primary ingredients.
• As a sweetener it can be used across a wide range of recipes.
• When decorating cakes with fruits, give them a coating of sugar syrup to add shine and preserve the fruits from turning brown due to oxidation.
• Sugar syrups are also commonly added to sweeten beverages like cocktails, mocktails and fruit juices.

How to store
• Until the seal is broken, store the unopened bottle in a cool, dry place at room temperature
• After breaking the seal, refrigerate the product to extend its shelf life.
• Since syrups contains a high amount of sugar, it acts as a preservative and ensures that the product has a long shelf life.
• Unopened bottles remain for a year with the flavour and taste of rose intact.




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